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Tag Archives: Adoption

  • A God Story in the Writing

    Posted on February 5, 2014 by Family Christian

    This past Thanksgiving, Family Christian had the privilege of being part of something amazing. After much prayer, we felt that God was asking us to step out in faith. To take a risk. To live dangerously for His Kingdom. He asked us to not do it alone.





    With you, our friends, we dedicated the Thanksgiving weekend to build an orphanage in Haiti. We dedicated the profits that were received on that weekend to God's Littlest Angels in Haiti for the Family Christian Angels House - a neonatal and infant orphanage.





    So, thank you for the generosity and selflessness. Together, we raised enough funding for a year of construction on this building. We join God’s Littlest Angels in prayer and belief that God will see this project through to completion!

    "Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me." Matthew 25:40


    This post was posted in Missions and was tagged with Featured, Adoption, Orphans, God's Littlest Angels

  • Look What You've Done

    Posted on January 2, 2014 by Family Christian

    What a year this has been.

    262 people traveled with us on 20 mission trips.

    29,798 child sponsorships through World Vision.

    $50,000 raised to aid an orphanage in China.

    Raised through The Haiti Challenge: $280,33 funding for the first year of construction for a neonatal and infant orphanage.

    43 adoptions through our nonprofit ministry.

    4 new widow homes built.

    8 widow homes restored.

    16 fuel efficient wood-burning stoves installed.

    33 water purifiers provided.

    114,531 Bibles donated to military members and their families.

    And we couldn’t have done it without you.

    Together, let’s accomplish even more next year!

    When you shop, you give.


    How do you put your faith in action?


    This post was posted in Missions, Bibles and was tagged with Featured, Missions, World Vision, Adoption, Orphans, Widows, Haiti, Water

  • Pat Williams on Adoption, Basketball and Living Life with Passion

    Posted on August 27, 2013 by John van der Veen


    Pat Williams is a basketball Hall-of-Famer, currently serving as co-founder and senior vice president of the NBA’s Orlando Magic. As one of America’s top motivational speakers, he has addressed thousands of executives in organizations ranging from Fortune 500 companies and national associations to universities and nonprofits. Clients include AllState, American Express, Citrix, Coca-Cola, Deloitte, Disney, Honeywell, IBM, ING, Lockheed Martin, Nike, Millennium Pharmaceuticals and Tyson Foods to name a few. Pat is also the author of over 80 books, his most recent title being The Difference You Make: Changing Your World Through the Impact of Your Influence.

    Pat and his wife, Ruth, are the parents of 19 children, including 14 adopted from four nations, ranging in age from 26 to 40. For one year, 16 of his children were all teenagers at the same time. Currently, Pat has 12 grandchildren and counting…with twins due in July. Pat and his family have been featured in Sports Illustrated, Readers Digest, Good Housekeeping, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and Focus on the Family as well as all of the major network and cable television news channels.

    I sat down and talked with Pat about his legacy as a father. To find out what motivated this man.  What follows is a candid overflow of his heart. This man is truly living with a passion.

    John: Pat, you certainly have had quite the legacy within both the basketball industry and within the sports community, but then you've also had a legacy over on the adoption side of things as well. Can you share a little bit, before we get in and talk about your book, can you share a little bit about how you and your wife were introduced to the concept of adoption or foster care, and why you as a family have pursued that?

    Pat: For the first 10 years of our marriage, my wife talked non-stop about adopting children that didn't look like us. She talked about almond eyes and I just couldn't fathom it. We had three birth kids and life was good. Finally at the 10-year mark, it became a major issue. Big issue. I realized that I had to take the initiative and get moving on this. Long story short, we learned about two little girls from South Korea who were available. We talked to our children and let them vote.

    John: This was a family process then?

    Pat: Family discussion and a vote. The vote was unanimous, let's do it. What an adventure that was. On September 12, 1983, these two little girls, two and three years old, arrived from Seoul, escorted by a couple of off duty flight attendants. There they were in the Philadelphia airport, handed to us, the new parents of two Korean girls. That launched it. Then I caught the bug. I kept thinking we can take two more. What's four more boys, or two little girls from Romania. At the end of 10 years, we had 14 adopted children. People ask all the time, "Was there a master plan here?" There wasn't. We just kept hearing about these children and felt God saying, "I'll provide." He always did, amazingly. We had enormous food bills and clothing, it was just massive. But to this day, God has always provided what we've needed to get the children raised and educated. I think there's a verse in the book of James. He's very, very big on widows and orphans. God has a special heart and these obviously were orphaned kids that we adopted. That promise is that if you take care of the orphans, God will make sure it works. That's what I've learned. I wish I could tell you that we've got a whole bunch of widow stories, but I don't at this point.

    John: I appreciate your honesty here.

    Pat: Maybe someday.

    John: Someday. Do you think, Pat, that adoption and foster care, the idea of looking at James 1:27 and putting that verse as a stamp on your family, has that influenced the work community that you have been participating in? Have other people within the sports category approached you or they been influenced by that type of methodology?

    Pat: Well, let me just say this, John, when we adopted these children, as years went on, we certainly were not reluctant to do media events. We did many of them, even though the kids were not all that thrilled about it. Nevertheless, we did a great deal of television and newspaper work. My thought was, let’s get the word out and see if we can inspire some other families to get into this whole adoption world. There are millions of kids that need homes, not all of them are available, but there certainly are a bunch of them. That was really the method behind the madness there. We did everything we could to spread the word and inspire other families. From time to time, we will hear from somebody, either with a letter or in person, who said, "We heard about your story, that was the trigger for knowing we needed to go and adopt." They'll talk about their two adopted kids from somewhere in the world. That always makes me feel good, real good actually.

    John: You've inspired, I'm sure, countless others. You have a new book coming out, called Coach Wooden's Greatest Secret. Why don't you just give us some background information about that. What is it about?

    Pat: Coach Wooden was a real hero of mine, as well as for millions of others. He let me into his life in the last decade of his life. I wanted to write a book called, How to be like Coach Wooden. He gave me his blessing, which I was thrilled about it. We did that book. I interviewed about 800 people who knew him or were in his world. That was all encompassing. Then, three years ago I had an idea, which we ended up doing. It was called, Coach Wooden, The Seven Principles That Shaped His Life and Will Change Yours. That goes back when he was in the eighth grade in a little country school in central Indiana. His father gave him a card with a seven-point creed on it. Coach Wooden lived his life by those seven points. That's the meat of that book. This latest book, called Coach Wooden's Greatest Secret, comes from having dinner with him one night years ago. I said to him, "Coach, is there one secret of success, perhaps, that you feel is preeminent, or really most important?” He thought for a minute, and then, in that understated way, said, "The closest I can come," (he wasn’t one to ram anything down your throat), "The closest I can come to one secret of success, is that it’s about a lot of little things done well." That was his little message over dinner that night at the Valley Inn near his home in Encino, California. As we begin thinking, I began to put together all these thoughts about where little things pay off. Little things done well really does make sense, if you do enough of them over a lifetime, it's going to be a pretty successful life. It's a good little reminder, I think, to people to focus on the little things, to do them well, patiently, and in the proper sequence. You really build a good foundation that way.

    John: What would be one of those little things that you have held close and dear to your heart through all these years?

    Pat: I think it would be the way I write books. I save everything, whether it's a story, a little quote, an antidote, or something I read in a book, I’ll mark it. For 30 years or so I've been doing that, just collecting daily something that might be valuable in a book somewhere along the line. If you were to come into my office and the credenza, you know, with the eight drawers that come out, I would think there're probably at least a million cards, which a woman types for me. She takes my material and types it on a card, which is really the research I do for books.

    John: What do you call that filing system?

    Pat: I call it priceless.

    John: [chuckles] Priceless, I love it.

    Pat: If you had ever told me 30 years ago that this would be the result of that accumulation, with no end in sight, but just day-by-day, little by little, I would have been amazed. I've been writing books for 30 years in my head, and these cards make it a reality. There they all are, by category, just capturing one day at a time--a little every day. I think Coach Wooden really has hit it on the head. Successful people just do what is right in front of them, however small; they just get it done. Then John would talk often about making each day your masterpiece. “Make each day your masterpiece.” I think about that a lot. The importance of taking each day—each simple, little day—and maxing it out. Draining the cup dry today. You can't change yesterday and tomorrow. Absolutely, suck the marrow out of the bones today. We can do that.

    John: Coach, as we're sitting here, you're kind of sitting on the edge of your seat, your kind of moving around, you are a passionate man. As I'm just noticing you, you seem like you are full of a passion towards something. What is the one thing you are most passionate about?

    Pat: I think I'm passionate about a number of things. Obviously, my family is a huge passion. I'm passionate about the Orlando Magic basketball team. I'm passionate, always, about the latest book. I'm passionate about my speaking world, my public speaking world. I'm passionate about Jesus. I'm passionate about my Christian walk. It will always be consistent and leave an impact on people. I'm not passionate about golf. I'm not passionate about fishing. I'm not passionate about stamp collecting, I'm passionate about those, maybe five areas of my life, and I stay pretty close to them.

    John: What has God been teaching you lately?

    Pat: That life isn't always the way we plan it. Two and a half years ago, I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, which I'd never heard of. It's cancer of the bone marrow, actually the blood in the bone marrow. That came out of nowhere. Obviously, it rocked my world and the family's world. I've been dealing with that for the last two and a half years. Responding quiet well to the treatments, which have gone well. I feel good, and am able to keep my full schedule. When an illness like that comes into your world, and you begin to think, "Lord, this is me, your buddy down here. You know, I've got a lot more to do for you, what's the deal here with this?" That was the initial reaction. Then, I realized that God was calling me to another ministry here in the closing years of my life, and it's a ministry to the world of cancer, which is such a huge issue in our country. Huge, one out of two men will deal with it in their lifetime, and one out of three women. Suddenly I'm in a fundraising position. I'm a hospital board member... I'm into things, who would have thought? At least once a day there's a phone call or an email about somebody who's struggling with some form of cancer and needs to talk. Needs a word of encouragement, just to hear that there's hope. I've been called into that world. I never saw that one coming.

    John: Coach, how can we be in prayer for you?

    Pat: Obviously, I covet prayers for my health. For a complete healing. People have prayed so consistently for me. I couldn't begin to thank them all. I'm so grateful. An old ball player, my good friend Bob Boone, who I've know for many, many years, called several months after all this happened and just said, "How are you doing, how are you doing?" I told him, "I'm really responding well; the doctors are pleased. I'm on the road to healing." And Boone, he said to me, "Boy," he said, "This prayer stuff works, doesn't it." That was pretty direct, wasn't it? I appreciate prayers for my health. I also really hope that this next book will impact people. We have so much to learn from the life of John Wooden, who lived till he was 99. He would have been 103 in June. He got close to 100. He was far beyond just a great coach, too, he was the greatest coach of all time. There’s so much wisdom there. So hopefully we're able to capture that in these books that I've done on him. This next one, Coach Wooden's Greatest Secret, is one I’m especially eager to see do well. We also covet prayers for our family, with that many children, 19, and now the grand children, which are coming pretty consistently. We've got 12 grandchildren and two more on the way in July, twin boys. There are a lot of moving parts in the Williams family these days.

    John: I love it.

    Pat: I appreciate that very much John.

    John: Great talking to you.


    This post was posted in Books, Interviews, John van der Veen and was tagged with Featured, Fathers, Adoption, Pat Williams

  • The Ever-Growing EveryWoman - An Interview with Lysa TerKeurst

    Posted on November 29, 2012 by John van der Veen



    In a world of facades, Lysa TerKeurst’s transparency is a breath of fresh air. That’s why people are gravitating to her newest book, Unglued. There’s something empowering about accepting you can’t keep it all together, but realizing that God loves you too much to let you keep losing it. Our recent interview with Lysa had us feeling like we were catching up with an old friend…

    Family Christian: Hey Lysa, could you start by telling us a little about your upbringing?

    Lysa TerKeurst: I was raised by a dad who was an atheist and a mom who went to church when she could. I had a chaotic upbringing in that my parents got divorced. When my mom got remarried, they started having more children. One of my sisters, (my half-sister, but still very much my sister) tragically died at a very young age because of some medication that a doctor gave her that was in too high a dose for her small body. So a lot of heartbreak, chaos and a lot of sadness in my upbringing, but at the same time I still very much remember my mom, even in the midst of so much brokenness being such a cheerleader for me. I always thought that I would grow up to be either a country music singer or the President of the United States. But as I got older I realized that I couldn’t sing and I didn’t like politics (laughs), so that proved to be a little problematic. But even so, my mom was such a cheerleader. She would always say, “Honey I think you sing great!” and “I still think you’d be a fantastic president,” so she’s just the ultimate encourager. I finally did find my niche in writing and then eventually in speaking. She’s continued to be such a wonderful encouragement to me. And so that’s a nutshell of how I got to be where I was. The country music singing and the road to the presidency didn’t really pan out like I thought it would when I was a small child (laughs), but I love what I do today.

    FC: So who is your favorite country artist?

    Lysa: Well when I was a little girl I was an absolutely huge Loretta Lynn fan. Of course she’s not really on the radio that much anymore so now I guess I’d say Taylor Swift, although I’m not sure people would qualify her as country music, but maybe. I like her music and maybe it’s because I have five teenagers and they like her music. So then in terms of Christian music I love good old fashioned praise and worship songs. Hands down that is my ultimate favorite. I’m so fortunate, I go to Elevation Church in Charlotte, NC and our worship team is amazing. That’s probably my favorite.

    FC: Lysa would you mind giving us a glimpse into how you were introduced to Jesus?

    Lysa: Yeah, well, like I said, growing up going to church was very hit or miss. We didn’t go on a consistent basis. One of my memories about going was when I was little (I was probably about 8 or so) and the pastor was one of the preachers that would bang his fist on the pulpit. Very animated. I just remember sitting there as a small child and thinking, he needs to try to relate to the younger generation a little better. And I don’t know why I thought this was a good idea, but I told my mom that I’d really like to go have a meeting with the pastor and she thought that I wanted to get baptized, but that’s not at all what I intended to speak with him about. When we got into his office I started telling him all of the mini-ways that I thought he could be a better communicator. And my mother was absolutely horrified, we didn’t really go back to that church after that. So we took a break from that for awhile – so when I say it was hit or miss, it was probably more misses than hits. Even when I was there I was always thinking of how people could do church a little bit more effectively and probably listening from the wrong vantage point. So I knew about Jesus but I can’t say that I understand what it meant to have a personal relationship until I was in my early 20s and it was after my baby sister died. I was very angry and running away from God and I wound up getting into a relationship where I got pregnant before I was married and made the really, really sad choice to have an abortion. There was something about the depth of brokenness that happened in my heart after the abortion that I cried out to God in complete desperation. Really what I was doing was begging God to let me die – to put me out of my pain. But God was so sweet and sent a person into my life that constantly put Scriptures in front of me. At first she really got on my nerves, but eventually the Scriptures started connecting deep in my heart. One night after reading one of her notes and pondering the truth of the verse that she put in front of me, I didn’t know how to accept Jesus Christ as my personal Savior so I just kneeled down right beside my couch in my little apartment and I just said yes to God. And my life has pretty much been a string of many days and years that followed of me continuing to say ‘yes’ to Him everyday.

    Lysa

    FC: That’s powerful. Thank you for sharing. Let’s switch gears a little and talk about your family’s story of adoption. Those who are familiar with you have probably already heard it, but could you tell us a little bit about how you and your husband decided to start down that path of adoption? And then how did that turn into impacting not just your family, but your faith community too?

    Lysa: Well, I did not have any plans to adopt because we already had three little girls. My husband and I felt very complete and I kinda always thought that adoption was for people who A. Either wanted lots of kids and had a real international perspective of family and maybe a missionary family or B. Families who couldn’t have children. And we weren’t either of those! We were an everyday family living in America with three little girls just trying to get through each day. My kids were small at the time (they were 9, 8 and 4). Life was very busy, very full. We didn’t feel like I was a good enough mom to have more children – I felt like I was barely hanging on, but the Lord directed us to go to a concert one night because one of my daughters was in Brownies (a division of Girl Scouts) [and they were] studying Liberia, so we thought it would be a good cultural experience for her. In the middle of the concert the Lord clearly said to my heart “Two of those boys are yours.” And after the concert two of the boys walked up to me, wrapped their arms around me and called me ‘Mom.’

    FC: And you had never met them?

    Lysa: No. I had never met them before. So it was a crazy thing. I never thought my husband would agree that we should adopt two teenage boys from Africa. It sounded scary and unreasonable, I didn’t think we could afford it, I didn’t think it was safe for my girls, I mean there were a lot of obstacles and lots of fears. And really, they were healthy fears. I mean, when you have three little girls, it doesn’t sound reasonable to adopt two teenage boys from the other side of the world. But God confirmed over and over and over to me and my husband that this was part of His unique plan for us. So while it might not make sense for most situations, God just assured us by paving the way, opening every single door, helping us to meet every single obstacle. He really calmed our fears by sending people into our lives who would speak truth to us. It was really pretty amazing how God just said, ‘maybe this isn’t an assignment that sounds reasonable or rational for anybody else, but it is my assignment for you.’ And so we agreed to adopt and then our friends all thought we were crazy. But we decided to have a concert to invite all of our friends just to get to know our boys a little bit better and to see them sing as part of the last stop that their choir was going to do. At that concert all of our friends who thought we were so crazy, the Lord moved in their hearts and they eventually all came forward and decided to adopt the rest of the boys in the choir, and then we ran out of choir boys! So then mission trips were formed and they went over to Liberia and more and more kids were brought back. As of now, we’ve had over 45 kids from those orphanages adopted into the families of our community.

    The TerKeurst family

    FC: That is unbelievable. Is it primarily people within your church or outside of your church too?

    Lysa: Yeah, it’s outside of our church. And really, it’s even outside of our community now too. There have been many children that family members in other cities or states have adopted, so it’s expanded out probably more than we’ll ever know. I mean, those 45 kids are just the ones that we know about, but I’d imagine that there have been many, many others that have been adopted, because we were on the Oprah show and the Today Show. We could look at the rate of adoption from Liberia into America, it grew dramatically. And we didn’t know all of those people, but we definitely saw a spike in interest after our story went so public.

    FC: We don’t know if you knew that here at Family Christian our calling is James 1:27, to look specifically after the orphan and the widow, so we have this huge campaign both inside and outside of our building to bring awareness and action. We are all about foster care and adoption. So to hear stories like yours is fantastic, near and dear to our heart.

    Lysa: Yes, I spent some time looking at your website, so I could understand fully what you’re doing. It’s called The James Fund, right?

    FC: Yes, The James Fund is our non-profit organization, and what they primarily do is help to seed other organizations and defray some of the cost of adoptions, but also to help build housing and make lives better domestically and abroad. We’re also part of the Nehemiah Project whose number one goal is to eradicate the foster care system within the United States. It’s bound and determined to find homes within the faith community for all of the kids within our foster care system. We believe that this is the church’s responsibility, and we want her to rise up and take initiative in this arena.

    Lysa: That’s amazing, I love that.

    FC: It’s a tall task, but we’re excited to see what God does with it. Ok, let’s talk about your new book Unglued. There are a few topics covered in your book and we were hoping you could comment on a couple of them. First ‘the working mother’s balancing act.’ You mentioned that “Women need to lean on other women to support them so they can let down their guard and become transparent.” How do you see that in your own life?

    Lysa: I definitely think motherhood – no matter if you’re a working mom or stay at home mom – is really tough sometimes. It can really leave us each day with a sense of wondering if we’re doing it right. You know, it’s a long term investment. You don’t see big returns in the short term. Raising a child can easily pull you into being hyper-focused on the tough everyday moments of life. The toddler that doesn’t want to be potty trained and the infant that won’t stop crying and the middle schooler who is just getting into these hormonal fluxes – happy one minute and so upset the next that you can’t even figure out what happened, then teenagers who are really trying to push the limits – I don’t want to be a child, and yet I need a parent, but I’m not yet an adult. It’s all these things, I mean; it can be really hard on a woman’s heart especially when the everyday is filled with moments that don’t feel so wonderful. We love our kids, we treasure our kids, but it’s so easy to get caught up in the chaotic emotions around trying to understand how to raise a child. So in Unglued, I really go right into a big issue that mom’s face, women face, even a lot of men face, and that is: how do we react in that moment of conflict? There’s going to be lots of conflicts that we face every single day, but what do we do in that split second when we’re just about to react to that thing that’s happening? The relationship conflict, or the situational conflict, or the stresses of everyday life that pull at our emotions. And so in Unglued, I really help people see that it is possible to exercise self-control in that split second before we react to the circumstances of our life.

    For the purpose of people better understanding themselves, I list out four different reaction types; there are two kinds of ‘Exploders’ and two kinds of ‘Stuffers.’ The Exploders need to add into that split second moment a pause and a dose of perspective. And in Unglued I show them how to do this. And then the Stuffers need to let go of pretending and let go of approving and I show them how to do those in the split second right before they react. It’s really amazing to see what kind of feedback we’ve been getting from people – not just moms. Certainly we’ve been hearing from moms because at the heart of who we are, we want to raise our kids right and be good examples, but sometimes the chaos of everyday emotion or circumstances make us question if we’re being good examples for our kids. We have been getting letters of marriages being saved, moms feeling like they’re becoming better moms, friendships being saved because people are having kind but honest conversations for the first time in their friendships, even work relationships are being repaired as people are learning how to better handle their reactions in the workplace. So it’s really cutting across all of the circumstances and situations that people face and equipping them to have better reactions. If you equip people to have better reactions, you’ll equip them to have better relationships.

    FC: You’ve said that the purpose of Unglued is not to get people to a place where they are perfect at keeping their emotions in check; the goal is “imperfect progress.” What would you say to the woman who looks at your life or people on a talk show who appear to have it all together and think “they have a perfect life, but mine is a complete disaster”? How do you address this person who sees their imperfections, or their messy house and compares it with this pedestal of perfection?

    Lysa: Well yeah, I’m one of those people because I look at other people all of the time and I think man, they’re so much better at life than me. So I am the woman who has the pile of laundry and the dirty kitchen (laughs) and the five kids who are sweet but sometimes disrespectful. It’s easy for me to compare myself to other people and really start feeling down because I compare their perfect outsides to my very imperfect insides. But here’s what the Lord’s really been teaching me: We aren’t supposed to strive for perfection everyday. If we were perfect, we’d have no need for Jesus. And it’s through our imperfections that we really feel the pull toward our need for a Savior. So the imperfections serve a wonderful purpose if we’ll let them. Now, do we always need to be striving to be better? Absolutely. But I encourage people in Unglued, to seek to make imperfect progress. Seek to get a little better each day. Wrap each step in grace and be okay that imperfect progress is at least moving forward, it doesn’t have to be perfect…

    FC: Thank you Lysa so much for talking with us today and for your insight. Keep up the good work, and we’ll keep helping to get the message out.

    Hearing From God In Your Daily Life

    Make sure that you follow Lysa and the other Proverbs 31 bloggers here.

    For additional resources from Lysa, click here.


    This post was posted in Books, Interviews and was tagged with Featured, The James Fund, Adoption, Oprah Winfrey, Lysa TerKeurst, Unglued, Divorce, Taylor Swift, Loretta Lynn, Elevation Church, Today Show, Nehemiah Project

  • Family, Cancer, Music and Resting in Hope - an interview with Karyn Williams

    Posted on August 22, 2012 by John van der Veen

    Karyn Williams

    Whether it's growing up with 18 brothers and sisters or journeying through her father's cancer diagnosis, Karyn Williams has stories to tell through her music. And that's just what she does on her debut release, Only You. Karyn recently talked with us about her music, the importance of family, and what God is teaching her now.

    Tell us a little bit about yourself. When did you begin to pursue music full time?

    From a young age, I knew that I wanted to surround myself with music; it's the only thing that has ever really made sense to me. Growing up, my dad spoke in churches a lot and my mom would travel with him and sing. One night when I was about three years old, I begged my mom to get up and sing with her. She reluctantly agreed thinking I would probably hide behind her skirt the whole time, but when the music started, apparently I grabbed the microphone and took over the song. She sat down on the pew in the front row (laughing of course) and watched me finish! I was hooked and music became my thing.

    In the summer of 2007, I felt the Lord tugging at my heart to move to Nashville and pursue a ministry in music. I was absolutely terrified, but I packed my car, said goodbye to my family in Orlando where I grew up, stepped out on faith and made the move.  It was the scariest experience of my life, but it was also the time when Philippians 4:7 came to life for me. Even though I cried the entire way to Nashville, I also had a peace that I couldn't understand or explain. I didn't know anyone or anything other than the fact that if the Lord was leading this journey, I knew I was in good hands.

    I made a promise to the Lord on the drive that day that I would walk through every door He opened, as long as I felt it was from Him. I have kept that promise and the doors He has opened led to signing a record deal at Inpop Records in 2011, paving the way for me to release my first full-length album.

    From the minute I walked in to Inpop, it felt like a big family hug and I'm beyond thankful to have such a great team of people around me who have true hearts for putting out music that will encourage people in their walk with the Lord! I'm so excited to have put together a collection of songs for this record, Only You that speak truth about the hope of Jesus; that's really the only thing that matters to me. The Lord has used music as a powerful tool in my own life to draw me close to Him, and my prayer is that these songs will do the same for other people.

    What do you hope people come away with after listening to your songs?

    As I have traveled and shared music over the last few years, there is one thing that has become very real for me: people are hurting. Sometimes in a very big way and sometimes in ways they don't show. There is something we are all carrying around or walking through every day of our lives that is difficult, unfair, or something we don't understand. We have gotten very good at putting smiles on our faces, walking out the front door and going about our day when sometimes we're dying inside.

    If there's one thing I want people to take away from these songs, it is hope. Real hope! We as humans can do without a lot of things in our lives, but hope is not one of them. Many of the songs on Only You were born out of a very personal (sometimes painful) place, so the journey of writing for this record has been very healing for me.  I believe the Lord has allowed experiences in my own life over the last few years so that I can share this music in a way that encourages someone else walking through the same thing. Sometimes all we need is someone to put their arm around our shoulder and say, "Hey, I know you're in pain right now.  I've been there, and you're gonna make it through."  Music has a way of healing and encouraging in a way that sometimes nothing else can.

    For me, being a Christian artist is the biggest honor in the world and it is even bigger than just the songs on this record. Ultimately it is about helping people connect to God in a deeper way and trying to provide real hope for real people living in the real world. The only thing that matters to me is that I spread hope and encouragement everywhere I go and the fact that the Lord has allowed me to do that through music…well that's the ultimate dream come true!

    Your first single, "Rest in the Hope" was born out of your dad's cancer diagnosis. How has God used this song since its release to radio?

    As songwriters sometimes we have to go searching for great song ideas, and then sometimes they fall in our lap. "Rest In The Hope" was a song that fell in my lap, but not in a way I ever expected or wanted.

    On February 4th, 2011, my dad called me with news that would change both of our lives forever. He shared with me that he had been diagnosed with a rare form of cancer called Multiple Myeloma, a blood & bone marrow cancer that was "incurable" and there was "no surgery" that could be done. I was devastated. I mean devastated. My dad has always been my rock, my hero, and then somewhere along the way to adulthood, he and I became great friends. We've done 7 marathons with each other, wrote a book together; he's just my favorite guy in the world. So this cancer news rocked me to my core and I walked around for many weeks in a complete fog trying to understand it and figure it out.

    I had a lot of questions for God, most of which started with the word "Why?" Those first weeks and months were extremely tough: lots of treatments, countless doctors appointments and lots of tears and uncertainty.

    After a few weeks, I remember collapsing on my bed in tears and asking my husband, "Am I ever going to feel normal again?" It was in that moment that I realized I was exhausted trying to figure it all out and I had to lay this down and allow God to be the One in control of this situation. When we don't understand something, our human nature is to wrestle it to the ground and try and figure out what God's doing in our lives. The truth is, we won't always understand, and His ways aren't our ways so we have to trust and rest knowing that He is still in control, no matter what we're walking through.

    Not long after my dad’s diagnosis, he said, “I thought I was close to the Lord before, but now I feel like I’m sitting on his lap hugging Him around the neck.” I thought that was such a beautiful picture of resting in the arms of Jesus and that is really the statement for how "Rest In The Hope" was born. When I realized this would be my first radio single to the world, I was overwhelmed.

    This song is personal for me in a way that’s hard to explain after walking through my dad’s illness. It is a song of comfort and hope, and my prayer is that whoever hears it will realize that the Lord is right there in the middle of whatever they’re going through. He knows right where you are and is walking with you every step of the way. We have a hope beyond measure and we really can rest knowing that He we belong to Him.

    Rest In Hope

    How have you and your family learned to "Rest in the Hope" since your dad's diagnosis?

    Well, cancer will definitely teach you to rely on the Lord in new ways! I will never ever forget the devastation of learning that news. It has given me a new understanding and a new respect for what people go through when someone close to them is diagnosed with cancer. Everything stops.

    Although I cried every day for weeks, I finally made the decision to lay it all down. I had no other choice. God is still God even in the middle of circumstances we don't understand. Cancer or any other difficult situations in our lives is not God punishing us; it is simply something He's allowing us to walk through as a chance to mold us, grow us and help us learn to rely completely on Him.

    I can remember the moment when I finally said, "Ok Lord, I may never understand this…but I'm not going to question it." We tend to only thing that we are "blessed" when things are going well in our lives. But I believe the Lord allows us to be in different situations in order to share His name. Sometimes we don't like those situations, but ultimately, the only thing that matters during our time on earth is that we shared Jesus with everyone we came in contact with. Whether that's done from a hospital bed or a pulpit – we all have a ministry to share right where we are.

    And how is your dad doing now?

    He is in remission! Praise the Lord!!! At his age (71 when diagnosed) getting his cancer in remission was going to be a challenge. He has always been a health nut and has always taken extremely good care of his body. He used to say, "I'm getting in shape for old age." Now he says, "I didn't realize it, but I was getting in shape for cancer." It was an extremely grueling process of treatment, but because of his good health at the time of diagnosis, he did a lot better than the doctors expected! It's a good lesson for all of us - skip the pizza and eat greens, and tomorrow morning, hit the gym instead of the donuts!

    Adoption is a central part of your family's story. How has adoption impacted you?

    I was four years old when my parents started adopted children, so I don't remember much before my brothers and sisters from different nations started joining our family.  I have siblings from Romania, South Korea, Brazil and the Philippines and I wouldn't trade it for the world.  My unique upbringing has definitely shaped me into the woman I am today; you learn a lot as the big sister in a family of 19 kids!

    My parents did a great job of keeping things running smoothly and stressing the importance of responsibility at a young age, so we all had morning and evening jobs that were age appropriate as we grew and matured. We were all very involved in sports, art, dance, cheerleading or whatever it was we were passionate about. If you came into our house on any given afternoon you'd find us outside playing basketball, swimming, sitting in the library reading a book or out back playing a family game of whatever we could come up with. Hanging around playing video games or staring at the TV was NOT an option! My mom ran a pretty tight ship; my dad used to joke that she wore sergeant stripes on her pajamas!

    When I was 12 years old, I traveled with my mom to Romania to bring home one of my little sisters, Gabriela (Gabi). I saw the orphanage where Gabi had spent the first five years of her life, and in an instant, my perspective changed. We have so much that we take for granted here in America, and seeing those conditions as a pre-teen really impacted me. All I've ever known is brothers and sisters who didn't look like me, but I have learned that if we put the color of our skin aside and get past our language barriers, we all have one thing in common and that is our universal need for God. No matter what side of the world you are from, God created us all with a void in our hearts that only He can fill.

    I am so thankful for everything instilled in me because of the diversity of my family. Growing up with so many people around, I learned quickly how to get along with different personalities and how to look past the color of someone's skin. I've seen what it means to give of yourself, and how to work together as a team. I also learned pretty quickly that life didn't revolve around me! There were a lot of kids to worry about, so we all had to pitch in, help where we could and we learned pretty quickly how to be self-sufficient.

    Watching my parents taught me what it means to open your heart to someone in need and I've seen firsthand the rewards that God has waiting for us when we do. My dad used to say, "I have 19 children, 14 of which are adopted but I forget which 14." I always loved hearing him say that because he never saw any difference in my biological siblings and adopted siblings.

    Because of his example, we all followed suite. From the minute a new child joined our family, we were so excited and tried our best to welcome them into the fold. As a longtime NBA Executive, my dad could have done a lot of things with what he and my mom were blessed with. But instead of building a bigger kingdom for themselves or going on more expensive vacations, they chose to invest in the lives of children in need. We are all adopted into the family of Christ and in some small way, I think what my parents did is a beautiful picture of the way God opens His arms to us and welcomes us into to His family.

    What has God been teaching you lately?

    The biggest thing the Lord has taught me this past year is to rely completely on Him. We read about it in Scripture and hear it preached in sermons all the time, but learning how to effectively do that is hard sometimes. As humans, our nature is to control things and many times we think we are in control. But these last few months for me between my dad's cancer diagnosis, walking through the process of making a record and so many other personal things in my life, the Lord has really helped me understand what it means to rely on Him in new ways.  He is in the One driving my life and I have found it works a lot better that way!

    The Scripture that I have made my life verse is Galatians 1:10, "Am I now trying to win the approval of human beings, or of God?" Decisions are easier with that mindset. We get so wrapped up and stressed in the busyness of our lives, and sometimes we forget that there's really only one thing we were put here to do and that's honor the Lord in everything we do and tell everyone we can about His love. The title track for this record, "Only You" was born out of that verse and the experience of doing this record has brought me to a place of knowing who my complete dependence is on.

    Two snippets from Karyn's album
    New Album Preview by karynwilliams

    To purchase Karyn's new album, click here.

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    This post was posted in Music, Interviews and was tagged with Featured, Galatians, Karyn Williams, Cancer, Adoption

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