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Author Archives: Boyd Bailey

  • Threatened by Change


    Here is this man [Jesus] performing many signs.If we let him go on like this, everyone will believe in him, and then the Romans will come and take away both our temple and our nation.  John 11:47-48

    Change can be our friend or our foe. It depends on our need for control. If we have to be in control, then our need for control can control us. Thus, we have the opportunity to trust Christ in exchange for our need to control. We play God when we feel like we have to be all knowing, when only the Almighty is omniscient. Frustration will follow a faith that requires a perfectly controlled environment, but peaceful is the person who embraces change and rests in Christ.

    The religious leaders were threatened by Jesus. His charisma, clear teaching and compelling character were competition to this gaggle of guys who sought to control the religious and political destiny of the nation. Yes, change is a threat to the status quo, because they feel like something better may replace their position and power. So, critics of change may create fear by promoting worst case scenarios to other insecure opponents of change. We shouldn’t be surprised if our belief in Jesus stirs up controversy. He is a threat to those who do not know Him.

    “There are six things the Lord hates... A false witnesswho pours out lies and a person who stirs up conflict in the community” (Proverbs 6:16, 18).

    Furthermore, Christ is a change agent. He changes the motivations of the human heart. Jesus introduces a joyless heart of greed--to a joy filled heart of generosity. The Holy Spirit sensitizes a self reliant heart, with one led by listening to the Lord. Our heavenly Father takes our heart that yearns for love, and lovingly takes us into His intimate care. Our life in Christ is not an add on to our old life, or even an extreme makeover. Salvation is a start over with our faith as our foundation.

    Therefore, followers of Jesus need not be threatened by His desire for change. Similar to an effective athletic team or successful company constantly look for ways to change for the better, so we remain pliable in asking the Spirit to reveal areas of needed growth in our character. A Christian without change is sleeping with the enemy, but a Christian being changed by Christ is a threat to the enemy. What change is He calling you to not only accept, but initiate? Change wins!

    “And he said: 'Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven'” (Matthew 18:3).

    Prayer: Heavenly Father, help me not to be threatened by change, but to invite Your life changing Spirit, into my life.

    Related Readings: 2 Chronicles 6:37; Ecclesiates 8:1; Jeremiah 7:4-6;  Luke 9:29; 1 Corinthians 15:51-52

    Post/Tweet today: Our life in Christ is not an add on to our old life; salvation is a start over with our faith as the foundation.  #wisdomhunters

    © 2014 by Boyd Bailey. All rights reserved.

  • Divine Christ


    Jesus called in a loud voice, “Lazarus, come out!” The dead man came out, his hands and feet wrapped with strips of linen, and a cloth around his face. John 11:43-44

    As a warm up to His own resurrection, Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead. The One who called Himself the resurrection and the life, brought a dead man back to life. This seventh miracle  recorded by John is the most outrageous. Who brings a man back to life after being dead cold  in the grave for four days? Only God can do this--Christ, 100% divine in nature, transcended His natural law of death with His supernatural law of love that brings back life. Jesus is God.

    Jesus in His humanity wept bitter tears, knowing there would very soon be tears of joy. He hurts when we hurt and He rejoices when we rejoice. Hallelujah our Lord Christ cares; in the middle of our crisis His calm comfort is available and His hope is on the horizon. Our divine Christ sees with compassion a dead end job, and gives us life with fresh vision and opportunity. Natural man may seek to squelch, even kill our dreams, but our divine Christ supersedes cynical claims. What man tries to destroy by discrediting, Christ can bring back to life in a full display of His glory.

    “God who gives life to the dead and calls into being things that were not” (Romans 4:17).

    Has something you hold dear died? A relationship that may have spiraled down into a suspicion filled scenario where neither of you trusts the other? The ability to enjoy a dear one’s company, because they have moved away or their physical functions are impaired? Whatever has died, trust Christ to bring back to life something exceedingly better. Our best and brightest imagination of what’s possible with God retreats penniless, compared to the incomprehensible riches of His grace.

    Above all, we look forward to the voice of Christ calling us forth from the dead. The final resurrection is anticipated by those dead in Christ, but is dreaded by those dead in their sin. The One who conquered death gives us the keys to escape death’s dungeon. What’s cloudy and overcast now, will be clear and sunny with Him. We may weep in the night of this life, but we will find the limitless joy of Jesus in the morning of our glorious resurrection body. In Christ, He sets aside our dingy grave clothes of sin, and robes us with His radiant robe of righteousness!

    “In a flash, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, the dead will be raised imperishable, and we will be changed” (1 Corinthians 15:52).

    Prayer: Heavenly Father, I praise You for the divine power of Your son Jesus Christ, who brings to life my life and love.

    Related Readings: Isaiah 26:19; John 8:58-59; Romans 6:4; Philippians 2:6; Revelation 22:12

    Post/Tweet today: Our imagination of what’s possible with God retreats penniless, compared to the incomprehensible riches of His grace.

    © 2014 by Boyd Bailey. All rights reserved.

  • Emotional Jesus


    When Jesus saw her weeping, and the Jews who had come along with her also weeping, he was deeply moved in spirit and troubled. “Where have you laid him?” he asked. “Come and see, Lord,” they replied. Jesus wept. Then the Jews said, “See how he loved him!" John 11:33-36

    Jesus felt; He felt deeply. He felt the intense sorrow of Mary and Martha losing their brother. He felt gratitude for friends and family who came alongside to support them in their grief. His spirit was moved and troubled by the trouble those He loved were experiencing. Yes indeed, our Lord wept with those who wept, and rejoiced with those who rejoiced. He was much more than the pale, emotionless European portraits of the renaissance. Love feels deeply human needs.

    Love takes the time to be with those who hurt and mourn over loss. Love in action is emotion expressed. Friendship is a communication of affection. We are strong for the weak, when we weep with the weak. Non-emotional responses to a hurting heart only prolong the healing. Thus, we pray by the Holy Spirit to enter into emotional access with our troubled friends and family. We love by being available and use words only when necessary. Love emotionally connects.

    “As he approached Jerusalem and saw the city, he wept over it” (Luke 19:41).

    What human condition deserves our empathy? Have we so insulated ourselves from pain that we are numb to those who silently suffer? Indeed, we are called by Christ to be intentional to comfort the comfortless. Others who grieve and wail from within need our supportive, tender compassion. So, almost stealth like: we cook a meal, sit by the bedside holding a clammy hand, cradle a crying baby in our arms, or hug a sobbing soul. Our love feels what those we love feel.

    Are your emotions whole, so you are able to wholly love another soul? If not, invite the sweet salve of Jesus’ comfort to free you to feel again. Under the Spirit’s control, freely express what you feel: anger, fear, insecurity, disappointment, grief or frustration. Feelings processed properly in prayer become helpful prescriptions for others stuck in sorrow. Learn the skills of emotional conversation, so you can help others locked up by unresolved pain. An expressive heart loves Jesus with its heart, so prayerfully speak what you feel and feel what you speak. Jesus does.

    “At that time Jesus, full of joy through the Holy Spirit, said, 'I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth'” (Luke 10:21).

    Prayer: Heavenly Father, thank You for the compassion and joy of Jesus, help me express my emotions in a healthy way.

    Related Readings: Job 16:5; Psalm 100:2; Isaiah 63:9; Luke 6:23; Hebrews 12:2; Jude 1:24

    Post/Tweet today:. Feelings processed properly in prayer become helpful prescriptions for others stuck in sorrow. #wisdomhunters

    © 2014 by Boyd Bailey. All rights reserved.

  • Trust and Verify


    Jesus said to her [Martha], “I am the resurrection and the life. The one who believes in me will live, even though they die; and whoever lives by believing in me will never die. Do you believe this?"  John 11:25-26

    Trust Jesus first and verify His claims second. We cannot recognize the works of God until we exchange our works for belief in God. Before Jesus demonstrated His ability to resurrect the dead, He asked Martha to believe He was the resurrection and the life. Her faith preceded His power. Real trust is not expressed in a sentimental reading of a creed or the halfhearted singing of worship songs. Genuine trust embraces Jesus--the resurrected Savior, and then experiences Jesus--the resurrected Lord. In Christ, we pass from death to life to be with Him and enjoy Him.

    Have you truly trusted Jesus and verified His presence and promises in your life? Belief is like a drawbridge into the comforts of Christ’s castle. Faith is a suspension bridge between sinful man and holy God. Trust is the tunnel under a river of worry, as we follow the Holy Spirit’s leadership toward the Lord’s best. Thus, make trust your ticket to traffic with Jesus. He promises peace, hope, forgiveness, wisdom, strength, direction, love and eternal life. Verify these things.

    “Then Peter came to himself and said, 'Now I know without a doubt that the Lord has sent his angel and rescued me from Herod’s clutches'” (Acts 12:11).

    Furthermore, we have daily opportunities to trust and verify with people. It may be a child who asks for a second, third or fourth chance. Perhaps a struggling work associate has improved his skills,and desires an opportunity to reengage with excellence. Has a friend violated a trust, but asked forgiveness and took responsibility for their immaturity? When we trust individuals we give them confidence. So, we clarify expectations (even in writing), we trust, and we check up. Yes, as we extend trust, it's easier for others to reciprocate. Trust grows healthy relationships.

    Most of all, have you totally trusted Jesus in your heart and mind? Have you sought to verify His claims in a loving personal relationship with Him? Unregenerate religion thinly cloaks a conscience still soiled from sin. But, a sensitive soul that’s been born again is transformed by a mind renewal. Once we are resurrected in Christ, by faith in Christ’s resurrection, we are positioned to observe His resurrection power. Our loving Lord can’t wait to bring back to life dead souls, dead relationships, and dead deals. Trust Him and enjoy verifying His great works!

    “We no longer believe just because of what you said; now we have heard for ourselves, and we know that this man really is the Savior of the world” (John 4:42).

    Prayer: Heavenly Father give me the humility to truly trust You and to verify Your works with an obedient heart, all for Your glory.

    Related Readings: 2 Kings 5:15; Nehemiah 8:12; John 6:35; 1 Corinthians 13:12; Galatians 4:9

    Post/Tweet today:As we extend trust, it's easier for others to reciprocate. Trust grows healthy relationships. #wisdomhunters

    © 2014 by Boyd Bailey. All rights reserved.

  • Spiritual Receptivity


    Then Jesus said, “He who has ears to hear, let him hear.” Mark 4:9

    Spiritual receptivity is necessary for the growing follower of Christ. Jesus knew that there had to be a willingness to want to know and understand, before there could be any comprehension of His teachings. This hunger for God is an innate appetite that only He can satisfy. Even if you do not hear, you can want to hear. This is the attitude of a growing disciple of Jesus Christ. A willing heart is what the Holy Spirit infuses with insight.

    Spiritual receptivity is born out of your attitude and validated by your actions. Actions are an indicator but not an initiator of openness to the Almighty’s agenda. Have you ever grown weary working for the Lord, struggling to have a patient attitude? Yes, we all have from time to time, but it is a patient and grateful attitude that hears Christ communicate the most clearly. Gratitude for His grace, love, and forgiveness leads to hearing His voice.

    His Word lodges alive and eventually bears fruit when the ears of your heart humbly listen to the Lord with an attitude of obedience. Jesus explained the results of a spiritually receptive heart; hearing and understanding His Word, thus finding faith and healing. Indeed, the comprehension of His ways is not limited to a select few “professional Christians”. In fact, their ministry vocation can become a stumbling block to belief.

    “For this people’s heart has become calloused; they hardly hear with their ears, and they have closed their eyes. Otherwise they might see with their eyes, hear with their ears, understand with their hearts and turn, and I would heal them. But blessed are your eyes because they see, and your ears because they hear. For I tell you the truth, many prophets and righteous men longed to see what you see but did not see it, and to hear what you hear but did not hear it” (Matthew 13:15–17).

    Spiritual receptivity means I submit to the Holy Spirit’s prodding to preempt my pride. Instead of reacting to raw data, I wait and process with prayer so I am able to gain God’s perspective,  not being rushed by the world’s way of doing things. Spiritual receptivity sees the face of God and hears the heart of heaven.

    “Whether you turn to the right or to the left, your ears will hear a voice behind you, saying, ‘This is the way; walk in it’” (Isaiah 30:21).

    Prayer: Do I hear with a heart toward hearing from heaven? Is my heart humbled to hear from the Holy Spirit?

    Related Readings: 2 Samuel 7:22; Jeremiah 6:10; Romans 11:8; 2 Timothy 4:3

    Post/Tweet today:.  Spiritual receptivity is positioned to see the face of God and hear the heart of heaven. #wisdomhunters

    Taken from the June 1st reading in Boyd’s 365-day devotional book, “Seeking Daily the Heart of God vol. 2”

    © 2014 by Boyd Bailey. All rights reserved.

  • I Am Sorry


    Godly sorrow brings repentance that leads to salvation and leaves no regret, but worldly sorrow brings death.  2 Corinthians 7:10

    “I am sorry” are three freeing words. “I was wrong”; “You were right”; “I apologize”; “Please forgive me”. All of these phrases communicate culpability. Sincere sorrow means taking responsibility. You initiate peace because your desire is to repair the relationship. Disharmony and disconnection are not acceptable options. Yes, someone may take advantage of your goodwill, but that’s in God’s hands. Have faith that God expects behavior that brings reconciliation. You put the relationship at risk if you resist humbling yourself and apologizing. Someone has to start by saying, “I am sorry”. It is smart to extend your apology as soon as possible. A more powerful apology occurs when you admit your error, transgression, or sin before you are found out. You take the first step in asking forgiveness because you know it is the right thing to do.

    Godly sorrow sends a message of change, for you want to change for Christ’s sake. You have sinned against your Savior and those you love. The pain inflicted is not worth continuing with the same bad habits. No one ever regretted repenting of sin. Godly sorrow leads to repentance, which results in transformation. Change occurs around a humble and honest heart. So, where do you start? Family is a logical place to extend your apologies. You hurt your parents by breaking off communication and care. Perhaps you have intentionally gone out of your way to not go there. There is a widening rift in the relationship. Now is the time to reach out and recover your relationship with your mom and dad. Take the time during the holiday season to pay a surprise visit or place a long overdue phone call. Start the conversation by saying, “I am sorry”.

    Sincere sorrow is a relational magnet, and trust reoccurs around repentance. When others sense you have really changed, they extend trust. However, they may withhold that trust until you prove yourself worthy of it. People who have been burned in the past by shallow and insincere sorrow will not automatically engage. They need time to see that your apology is authentic. Sorrow that does not lead to change results in relational death. Sincere sorrow hurts your heart, causing you to weep visible or invisible tears of remorse. It makes you sick to think you let down the One who loves you the most.

    On the flip side, be patient with those who ask your forgiveness. Forgive them and give them a chance to change, while releasing your anger and their broken promises to Jesus. Give them over to the Lord and pray for their repentance. God can do more with a person’s heart in a minute, than a lifetime of your nagging could ever accomplish. Do not hold them in contempt. Rather, entrust them to Christ. Give time for repentance to root out bad habits and destructive behaviors. Lies can be extracted by the everlasting love of God and replaced with His transforming truth. Accept apologies at face value and hope for the best. Pray for the work of the Holy Spirit to have His way in a humble heart. Be quick to forgive and just as quick to ask forgiveness. Replace fear with faith. Your sorrowful confession connects with Christ and with others. Therefore, take the first step and apologize. Ask for forgiveness, and surrender to your Savior. Become broken, for brokenness leads to freedom. Say, “I am sorry”, and see how your Savior blesses your apology.

    Post/Tweet today:. Sincere sorrow is a relational magnet, as trust reoccurs around repentance. #wisdomhunters

    Taken from the May 31st reading in Boyd’s 365-day devotional book, “Seeking Daily the Heart of God vol. 1”

    © 2014 by Boyd Bailey. All rights reserved.

  • Sickness for God’s Glory


    Jesus said, “This sickness will not end in death. No, it is for God’s glory so that God’s Son may be glorified through it.  John 11:4

    Sickness is an opportunity for God to be glorified and for observers to believe in Jesus, God’s Son. This perspective is easy to forget, because sickness is often a struggle. The physical body can be extremely demanding. It can writhe in pain, convulse from seizures, sweat from fever, ache from infection, and fatigue from fighting cancer. Some feel so badly, they are ready to go home to heaven. In the meantime, illness can be a hard, but meaningful moment for God’s glory.

    Furthermore, the Lord uses sickness to draw people to each other and to Himself. A sick child causes mom and dad to come together on their knees on behalf of their precious one. Elderly parents are an invitation for adult children to spend time together and to work together for the betterment of their parent’s quality of life. Sickness can reveal a heart of giving or a heart of taking. As we serve the sick, those who need Jesus see His love in action.

    “The strong spirit of a man sustains him in bodily pain or trouble, but a weak and broken spirit who can raise up or bear” (Proverbs 18:14, The Amplified Bible)?

    Are you struggling with sickness? If so, seek to experience the intimacy of God’s glory in the middle of your illness. Your afflictions can be eclipsed by His glory. Similar to the stamina of a mother caring for a needy child, His glory engulfs your soul with energy to endure chronic pain. The sweet spot of His sweet Spirit provides security in your sickness. Christ’s peace guards your heart and mind to get through intense health issues. God’s glory gives you hope and healing.

    Is someone you love suffering from an illness? How can you glorify God in your love for them? Start with a simple prayer for the Holy Spirit to strengthen your sick friend by His grace and love. Share Scripture with them, such as Psalm 59:16-17 for comfort and peace. Your faith in God is a rock to those whose world is being rocked by adversity. Be available to support them by caring for their children or raising funds to pay for their medical bills. Prepared to give a reason for their hope in Him,God’s people love and serve like Jesus, glorifying Him.

    “But in your hearts revere Christ as Lord. Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have. But do this with gentleness and respect” (1 Peter 3:15).

    Prayer: Heavenly Father, use my illness or the sickness of a loved one to bring glory to my Savior Jesus Christ.

    Related Readings: John 9:2-3; 2 Corinthians 3:18, 4:6; Colossians 4:6; Hebrews 1:3

    Post/Tweet today:Your faith in God is a rock to those whose world is being rocked by adversity. #wisdomhunters

    © 2014 by Boyd Bailey. All rights reserved.

  • God’s Timing


    Now Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus. So when he heard that Lazarus was sick, he stayed where he was two more days.  John 11:5-6

    God’s timing is not always our timing. We see the immediate, He sees the long term. We feel pain and desire relief, He sees our pain and offers comfort. We pray for God to do something, He wants us to do something. We want conflict resolved, He wants our resolve to be trust in Him. We want to be an overnight success, He wants our character to grow with our success. We want financial security, He wants us to be generous with what we have. We want meaningful relationships, He wants us to initiate friendships.  We want health, He wants to glorify Himself.

    God’s timing is all about what He wants for us, not what He wants from us. Jesus loved Mary, Martha, and Lazarus, but He delayed His blessing. He delayed the blessing of healing for the greater glory of bringing Lazarus back from the dead. What we may perceive as the Lord’s indifference, is in reality, His loving patience and grace to provide something better. So, we may be deeply wounded by a broken wedding engagement, but in retrospect we see God’s protection.

    Jesus said, “This sickness will not end in death. No, it is for God’s glory so that God’s Son may be glorified through it” (John 11:4).

    God’s timing is all about God’s glory. The Lord’s heart is for relationships to reflect His glory. Thus, we patiently wait on a marriage partner who will bring God the most glory. Outer beauty with inner attractiveness is a catalyst for Christ’s glory. Fearful impatience can push us to settle for less than the Lord’s best. As you are waiting on direction from the Lord, be with the Lord. If Jesus feels distant, ask Him to soothe your soul. Learn how to love better by being loved better.

    If you just broke up with a long time love, perhaps you wait before you date. Take  a year off from dating and go deeper in your love relationship with your Heavenly Father. Let your heart heal. A year of intense intimacy with God is preparation for a life long marriage of joy built on Jesus. What feels like love delayed is love growing you into a mature man or woman of faith. Jesus wants to love you deeply, so you can learn to love deeply. A sentimental love of your Savior will not sustain you through suffering, but a radical love will. His timing is what’s best.

    “Since ancient times no one has heard, no ear has perceived, no eye has seen any God besides you, who acts on behalf of those who wait for him” (Isaiah 64:4).

    Prayer: Heavenly Father, give me the patience to wait on Your best and the humility to glorify You in the process.

    Related Readings: Psalm 115:1; Isaiah 30:18; Hosea 12:6; John 17:24; Titus 2:13; Jude 1:21

    Post/Tweet today:Fearful impatience can push us to settle for less than the Lord’s very best. #wisdomhunters

    © 2014 by Boyd Bailey. All rights reserved.

  • Prophet or Preserver


    He [David] said to Nathan the prophet, “Here I am, living in a house of cedar, while the ark of God remains in a tent.”Nathan replied to the king, “Whatever you have in mind, go ahead and do it, for the Lord is with you.  2 Samuel 7:2-3

    Prophets push us to change for the better. They remind us of God’s standards of better behavior, better beliefs, and a better world. These gifted discerners cut through the chaos of a crisis  clearly defining what’s needed to correct the course of a life adrift, a country without moral moorings, or an organization in transition. Prophets are not always popular, because what they proclaim is not popular. Apathy snuggles up to the status quo, while prophets call for change.

    Preservers on the other hand, are content to maintain what’s been established. They are risk averse and want to protect what’s been gained over years of hard work. Some companies have risk management departments to assess the probabilities of success and failure. Preservers follow behind prophets to codify change, so it can be sustained. Thus, prophets and preservers are necessary in God’s game plan. One without the other weakens the overall effectiveness of both.

    “Once these signs are fulfilled, do whatever your handfinds to do, for God is with you” (1 Samuel 10:7).

    Nathan was a prophet who challenged David to follow hard after God. He also confronted David in his moral failure and called him to confession and repentance. Ironically, David wanted to build a temple for God, but the Lord left that assignment to his son Solomon. So, are you a prophet or a preserver? Perhaps you are a prophet, but God is leading you to invest more time in preserving relationships and results. The stewardship of your life work requires preservation.

    Furthermore, you may be a preserver who opposes change. You have calculated faith right out of the equation. A life led by the Spirit sometimes engages an unconventional course of action.  Thus, be open handed in your giving, open minded in your thinking, and openly Christian in your conversations. Invite a prophet into your life who will tell you in love what you need to hear, not what you want to hear. Prophets and preservers complement well those who follow God’s will.

    “Whoever tries to keep their life will lose it, and whoever loses their life will preserve it” (Luke 17:33).

    Prayer:Heavenly Father, give me the humility to listen to prophets and the discipline to preserve Your ways.

    Related Readings: Exodus 16:34; Joshua 1:5; Proverbs 3:21; Matthew 9:17; Luke 1:28; Galatians 2:5

    Post/Tweet today:Apathy snuggles up to the status quo, while prophets call for change. #wisdomhunters

    © 2014 by Boyd Bailey. All rights reserved.

  • A Leader Worth Following


    I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep.  John 10:11

    Some questions that humble me as a leader are; “Am I a leader worth following?” “Do I model the values of our work and home culture?” “Do I do what I ask the team to do?”  “Am I willing to give up my own interests for what’s best for everyone else?” And the question that looms largest, “Will I lay down my life for my family and friends?” For me to be a leader worth following, I will answer affirmative to these revealing questions. Mostly though, I must follow the good shepherd,Jesus.

    Jesus is the ultimate leader worth following. He is not “a,” but “the” Good Shepherd. He is good because He is God, and He grows good leaders. The good shepherd Jesus defends the sheep from aggressive enemies. Just as the shepherd David battled the lion and bear on behalf of his flock, so Jesus engages the enemy on our behalf. He sees danger coming before we do, so what may seem an unnecessary diversion may be His protection from a bad decision or bad people.

    “The prudent see danger and take refuge, but the simple keep going and pay the penalty” (Proverbs 27:12).

    A leader worth following protects his or her people. He lays down his life, his interests, and his ego for the greater good. The other centered leader also invests in her team. She spends time in mentorship. Over lunch she systematically  helps the less experienced process their pressure points. The leader is vulnerable about her own issues and how she learned from others. A safe culture invites honesty, and the opportunity for professional growth.

    Furthermore, what are some ways you can invest in the character of those who look to you as their leader? You have to be good in order to teach others how to be good. Your generosity enhances a culture of generosity. Your care creates a caring culture. Expose your team to books, trainings and conferences that challenge and grow their character and skills. Begin a weekly or monthly educational process that infuses the values of the culture throughout the enterprise. A leader worth following is out front as an example, among the team to learn, and behind in prayer.

    “Follow my example, as I follow the example of Christ” (1 Corinthians 11:1).

    Prayer: Heavenly Father grow me into a leader worth following. Lead me to lead like Jesus.

    Related Readings: Proverbs 14:16; 1 Corinthians 4:16-17; Philippians 3:17, 4:9; 2 Timothy 2:2

    Post/Tweet today:A leader worth following is out front as an example, among the team to learn, and behind in prayer. #wisdomhunters

    © 2014 by Boyd Bailey. All rights reserved.

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“to look after orphans and widows in their distress...” James 1:27 NIV

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