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Ask It: The Question That Will Revolutionize How You Make Decisions

Andy Stanley, Mandy Stanley
Ask It: The Question That Will Revolutionize How You Make Decisions

Nobody plans to make mistakes. They just happen. There's money we wish we hadn't spent, relationships we should have avoided, jobs we'd like to forget. Helping you avoid these pitfalls, Stanley shows you how to consider "What's the wise thing to do?" and then helps you do it... Read More

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Nobody plans to make mistakes. They just happen. There's money we wish we hadn't spent, relationships we should have avoided, jobs we'd like to forget. Helping you avoid these pitfalls, Stanley shows you how to consider "What's the wise thing to do?" and then helps you do it!

Product Details:
Page Count: 198
Released: 10/2014
  • Store Only: Yes
  • Product type: Book
  • Format: Softcover
  • Release Date: Nov 18, 2014
  • UPC: 9781601427182
  • Volumes/Discs: 1
  • Pages: 198
  • Publish Date: Oct 21, 2014
  • Language: English
  • BISAC: "REL012070"
  • ISBN: 1601427182

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Loved it, loved it, loved it. by GenaMcCown.com on 3/2/2015
Rating

I love a book that gets straight to the heart of the matter, without a lot of unnecessary filler. Andy's book does just that, while reiterating the most important points from the book, for a cohesive, forward moving and impacting study. The DVD that goes with the book is a concise version, great for small group sessions or in a single sitting viewing with your friends or church. However, if you want to delve deeper, the book not only does that... but there are great discussion/reflection questions at the end that coincide with each chapter. You'll find yourself underlining, highlighting, circling and dogearing your way throughout the book. Great book, great study, great teacher.

Good, but Not Perfect: Hard-Hitting, but Not Deep by titus2homemaker on 11/25/2014
Rating

(This review first appeared at Titus 2 Homemaker.)

I received a copy of this book from the publisher to facilitate my review. However, as always, all opinions expressed here are entirely my own.Ask It, by Andy Stanley -- review at Titus 2 Homemaker #t2hmkr

"....Do I stay or do I go? Is he (or she) the right one for me? Should I buy this? Sell that? Start this? Stop that? Invest here? Commit there? I know a question that makes it easy to determine the answer to all these others."

So begins Ask It, by Andy Stanley. (Well, almost. The quoted portion is from the first paragraph of the introduction.) I think this oversells it. The question (which you'll get to near the end of the third chapter) does not have this universal ability to conquer all the hard questions. BUT...it's a great question.

In fact, with a bit of change in wording, I've said it myself. I've said in the past that all too often we ask ourselves the wrong question. We ask, "How much can I get away with?" That is, "How close to the line can I get without its actually being sin?" But that's the wrong question. The question we ought to be asking is "How can I most please God?"

That's the message of this book. He words it a little differently, but the underlying point is the same. Don't ask how much you can get away with. Then you have no "cushion." Especially in areas of sexual temptation, that is very dangerous ground!
A Couple Quibbles

There were a couple areas where I thought the book was lacking in precision in a notable way. (I also prefer my wording of the question, although his also helps add another "angle" on it.)

The first is in chapter 8. He is describing alternatives to the one who is "wise." He offers up three different "versions" of the unwise -- three "levels" of foolishness, if you will. The first is the "simple." This is the one who is foolish through ignorance. The "Fool" is knowingly foolish. The "mocker" is knowingly foolish and mocks those walking in wisdom, to boot! (This is the author's breakdown. I have not studied this idea of "degrees" of foolishness.)

My difficulty with this is in the way he describes the "simple" man. He says they "just lack something older people have: experience," and over the next several paragraphs it's strongly implied that gaining experience is how we gain wisdom in this area. But he omits a very important tidbit! "The testimony of the LORD is sure, making wise the simple"! (Ps. 19:7) We don't necessarily need experience (not that experience is always a bad thing); we need the Word.

The second is in chapter 18, where the author notes that it is key to know what we don't know, offering by way of illustration the example of making a financial decision without knowledge of accounting and, thus, calling in someone with accounting knowledge. He fails to differentiate between knowledge and wisdom. Seeking wise counsel is also a Scriptural mandate, but it isn't the thing he illustrates. What he illustrates is obtaining the knowledge we need.

I don't think it's theologically perfect, either, but there are very few books I believe are. I see little hints of what I consider inaccurate theology creeping in around the edges in a few places.
A Good Heart

But the heart of the book and the real message it conveys are excellent. It's very blunt and hard-hitting -- especially in the areas of sexual sin and temptation -- but it's discreet. Off the top of my head, I don't recall anything I would consider inappropriate for a young or middle teen. (Don't hold me to that, though. I wasn't specifically watching for that as I read.) It's also very practical and pretty easy to understand, so it would be an effective option for a teen.

I didn't find anything "new" for myself here, but I was convicted of my failure to systematically or intentionally pass on to my children the importance of weighing their decisions through this particular filter. I need to work on that.

And he makes an excellent point regarding asking others for wisdom! He points out that often we don't ask others for their insights before making a decision because we don't want others to know our decisions. But in most cases, they're going to be known sooner or later, anyway -- and those around us will have opinions about them, anyway. Might as well ask ahead of time and help avoid spiritual potholes.
A Couple Favorite Quotes

There were two passages in particular that especially stood out to me.

"We have about a zillion singles in our church. Many come to faith as a result of brokenness associated with unsuccessful relationships. In his or her own way, each of these people comes asking the question, 'Why does every relationship end the same way?' In most cases the answer is, 'Because every relationship started the same way.'"

"Asking for help is not a reflection of your lack of wisdom. Asking for input is evidence of wisdom."

Minor seed-spitting required, but worth the read, especially for younger believers or those who struggle with sexual temptation.


Proclaim the Good News | Mark 16:15
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